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How can publishers win the fight against ad blocking?

How can publishers win the fight against ad blocking?

Ad blocking is hitting publishers hard by preventing them from monetising their content. We explore how publishers can continue to keep their readers happy while making money from their online content, and whether there is a viable alternative to advertising.

GDPR Roundtable: The opportunity for change

GDPR Roundtable: The opportunity for change

Six months remain until the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into force, transforming the way organisations collect, store, and process the personal data of individuals in the European Union forever.

Your last-minute survival guide to dmexco 2017

Another year, another dmexco. Given we’re stalwarts of this celebration of all things advertising, we thought we would share some of the hints and tips we’ve picked up along the way.

The era of opportunity: Our key takeaways from Cannes Lions 2017

The era of opportunity: Our key takeaways from Cannes Lions 2017

Last month the 64th International Festival of Creativity, Cannes Lions, once again made its presence known on the French Riviera. Regarded as the go-to festival for the media industry – with attendees ranging from marketing and media executives to well-known faces including Ed Sheeran, Fatboy Slim and Dame Helen Mirren – the team from GingerMay PR made sure they were in the thick of the action.

Bringing attribution to the forefront

Bringing attribution to the forefront

Given the recent focus on transparency and brand safety scandals, it’s safe to say attribution may have slipped off the radar for some in the adtech industry.

Is cyber crime the price of connectivity and how can it be tackled?

Is cyber crime the price of connectivity and how can it be tackled?

Cyber crime is on the rise. With the Queen recently opening a National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) intended to keep the UK safe from hackers, there’s no doubt the issue is being taken seriously. This move comes after reports that over the 12 months up to June 2016, the UK was hit by more than five million fraudulent and computer misuse incidents — making online fraud the most common crime in the country.